This blog answers the question “How Much Is Council Tax A Month?” It calculates the exact amounts paid annually and monthly for council tax (for each tax band) in four different UK Councils. Property size and value dictate the council tax band allocation decision and therefore also determine the monthly bill for each taxpayer.

How Much Is Council Tax A Month?

Your basic monthly payment for council tax is calculated based on the Band your property is valued in by the VOA (Valuation Office Agency). To get an idea of how much you will have to pay each month on a newly acquired property, you need to have a list of the tax rate for property bands in your council (for the current tax year).

This value for council tax based on property bands has significant avenues of support for pension-aged taxpayers. Guaranteed Pension Credit and State Pension Credit as well as other benefits such as the Attendance Allowance can reduce your council tax bill by a significant amount. In order to qualify for these benefits pensioners will generally need to have a level of savings under £16000 and income under a certain amount.

How much is my council tax bill for the year?

Your council tax bill for the year depends on the Band your property is valued in and the council in which your residence is located. Knowing your monthly bill first makes it easier for you to choose the installment method which best suits you. These options are 12 monthly or 10 monthly payments in a year.

To calculate your monthly council tax payment just divide the yearly bill figure by 12.

What is my total yearly council tax amount for each of the council tax bands?

Your yearly council tax bill depends on which council you live in, so your bill could be different from a person living in another council by a maximum of a few hundred pounds 

If you live in Bristol Council, your yearly tax is:

  • £1486.91 for a property valued in Band A
  • £1734.73 for a property valued in Band B
  • £1982.55 for  property valued in Band C
  • £2230.37 for a property valued in Band D
  • £2726 for a property valued in Band E
  • £3221.64 for a property valued in Band F
  • £3717.28 for a property valued in Band G
  • £4460.74 for a property valued in Band H

If you live in Ealing Council, your yearly tax is:

  • £1156.99 for a property valued in Band A
  • £1349.82 for a property valued in Band B
  • £1542.65 for a property valued in Band C
  • £1735.48 for a property valued in Band D
  • £2121.14 for a property valued in Band E
  • £2506.81 for a property valued in Band F
  • £2892.47 for a property valued in Band G
  • £3470.96 for a property valued in Band H

If you live in Bradford Council, your yearly tax is :

  • £1224.93 for a property valued in Band A
  • £1429.08 for a property valued in Band B
  • £1633.23 for a property valued in Band C
  • £1837.39 for a property valued in Band D
  • £2245.70 for a property valued in Band E
  • £2654.00 for a property valued in Band F
  • £3062.32 for a property valued in Band G
  • £3674.78 for a property valued in Band H

If you live in Liverpool Council, your yearly tax is:

  • £1420 for a property valued in Band A
  • £1656 for a property valued in Band B
  • £1893 for a property valued in Band C
  • £2129 for a property valued in Band D
  • £2603 for a property valued in Band E
  • £3076 for a property valued in Band F
  • £3549 for a property valued in Band G
  • £4529 for a property valued in Band H

If you live in Manchester Council, your yearly tax is:

  • £1248.39 for a property valued in Band A
  • £1456.45 for a property valued in Band B
  • £1664.52 for a property valued in Band C
  • £1872.59 for a property valued in Band D
  • £2288.70 for a property valued in Band E
  • £2704.83 for a property valued in Band F
  • £3120.97 for a property valued in Band G
  • £3745.17 for a property valued in Band H

If you live in Nottingham City Council, your yearly tax is:

  • £1529.43 for a property valued in Band A
  • £1784.33 for a property valued in Band B
  • £2039.23 for a property valued in Band C
  • £2294.14 for a property valued in Band D
  • £2803.95 for a property valued in Band E
  • £3313.76 for a property valued in Band F
  • £3823.57 for a property valued in Band G
  • £4588.28 for a property valued in Band H

How much does this come to per month?

If you live in Bristol Council, your monthly council tax payment is:

  • £123.91 for a property valued in Band A
  • £144.56 for a property valued in Band B
  • £165.21 for a property valued in Band C
  • £185.86 for a property valued in Band D
  • £227.17 for a property valued in Band E
  • £268.47 for a property valued in Band F
  • £309.77 for a property valued in Band G
  • £371.73 for a property valued in Band H

If you live in Ealing Council, your monthly council tax payment is:

  • £96.42 for a property valued in Band A
  • £112.49 for a property valued in Band B
  • £128.55 for a property valued in Band C
  • £144.62 for a property valued in Band D
  • £176.76 for a property valued in Band E
  • £208.90 for a property valued in Band F
  • £241.04 for a property valued in Band G
  • £289.25 for a property valued in Band H

If you live in Bradford Council, your monthly council tax payment is:

  • £102.28 for a property valued in Band A
  • £119.09 for a property valued in Band B
  • £136.06 for a property valued in Band C
  • £153.12 for a property valued in Band D
  • £187.14 for a property valued in Band E
  • £221.17 for a property valued in Band F
  • £255.19 for a property valued in Band G
  • £306.23 for a property valued in Band H

Is it possible to challenge a completion notice?

Yes, it is possible to challenge a completion notice by appealing to the Valuation Tribunal. You can challenge a completion notice in the following cases:

  • Your property is being constructed
  • You are making major structural alterations to your property

The challenge must be made within 28 days of receiving the completion notice because the notice mentions the date on which council tax first becomes due on the property.

A property is considered as being complete for council tax purposes when :

  • The 12 components (Roof, Lintels, Beams and slabs, columns, walls, floors, stairs, Damp Proof Course, foundation, plinth, and plinth beams) forming the basic structure of a house are complete and the property is sheltered from the effects of weather. 
  • The flooring is complete
  • Structural work (or first fix) has been initiated which may include building the wall studding, setting up plumbing and drainage systems, electric cable installation, stairs, building roof struts or gas mains have been installed.
  • The partition walls have been constructed
  • The hardware for electricity, gas and water systems has been laid down

The second fix of property construction includes the installation of radiators and boilers

In order for a property to be considered ready for banding the following work is not required to be complete:

  • The final installation of bathroom and kitchen furniture
  • The final installation of the electrical grid (including switches and wall plugs)
  • The final installation and induction of the electricity, gas, and water supply systems
  • The completion of the interior design of the property 

Conclusion

This blog post addressed the question “How Much Is Council Tax A Month?” The amount payable as council tax per month depends on which council tax band your property is in. The closer your band is to Band A, you will be paying an amount roughly between £95-£125.

 For properties valued in or around council tax Band D your monthly bill will be between £140-£185 (estimated average varying by council rates). If your council tax band is close to the highest band (Band H which is for properties valued above £320000) you will be paying roughly between £310-£380.

Please feel free to comment on the content or ask any questions in the comments section below :

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): How Much Is Council Tax A Month?

I have received a letter from HMRC asking me questions, what should I do?

Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs might be asking you a question to clarify something they don’t understand and they might be asking you to send them some particular documents.

Set up a folder that will hold all of the letters about the enquiry between you and HMRC including copies of any documents sent. You should also include any notes of telephone calls that you have made giving dates and the name of the HMRC officer you spoke to

HMRC uses enquiries to make sure that you are paying the right amount of tax.

What is the high income child benefit charge?

If you or your partner has an adjusted net income of over £50000 and one of you gets child benefit you will have to pay an extra amount on your council tax bill.

The charge will also apply to you if you receive contributions to bear the expenses of a child from another person who does not live with the child but :

  • Receives child benefit in the name of that child
  • Neither they (or their partner) are liable to the charge themselves

Is financial support for international students taxable in the UK?

In most circumstances the financial support for international students in the UK will not be taxable. As the students are foreign citizens and in some cases their financial aid is partly funded by organisations in their home country it is not counted for tax.

What was missing from this post which could have made it better?