Parking violations can range from parking in a restricted area after hours to parking without paying charges. Through this blog post, we aim to explain the different modes of payment for a parking fine or a PCN in Oldham Council, the reasons why PCNs are issued to drivers, how many days one has to pay a PCN once they receive a notice, whether or not an erroneous parking fine can be appealed against and the process of the application.

How Do I Pay PCN In Oldham? 

You can pay your PCN payments to Oldham Council in any of the following ways:

  • Through an online payment
  • Through a phone payment using your debit/credit card
  • Through a crossed cheque sent by the postal service

If you make your PCN payment to Oldham Council within 14 days of receiving notice, 50 per cent of the amount from your charges will be waived off by the authorities.

As per the Oldham Council website, below are details of charges:

ChargeAmount
Higher Level Charge£70
Higher Level Charge Paid Early£35
Higher Level Charge after service of Charge Certificate£105
Lower Level Charge£50
Lower Level Charge Paid Early£25
Lower Level Charge after service of Charge Certificate£75
Bus Lane Charge£60
Bus Lane Charge Paid Early£30
Bus Lane Charge after service of Charge Certificate£90

According to the Oldham Parking Policy, higher charges include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • being parked in a designated disabled parking space without displaying a blue badge in the prescribed manner
  • being parked on a taxi rank
  • being parked where it is prohibited
  • stopped on a restricted bus stop or stand
  • being parked in a permit space without displaying a valid permit

Meanwhile, lower charges may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • being parked in a meter bay  when the penalty time is indicated
  • being parked after the expiry of paid time
  • being parked at an out of order meter during controlled hours
  • being parked without paying the parking charge
  • being parked with the vehicle engine running where prohibited

The UK government has introduced a specific scheme during Covid-19 to benefit NHS health and social care staff, as well as NHS COVID-19 volunteers/critical care workers; through which parking concessions are available for health, care and volunteer workers. If you fall under any of these categories, you should have a special parking permit and councils will not issue a PCN unless you have parked dangerously. 

Why Is A PCN Issued?

A PCN is issued by council authorities if someone has violated parking laws on public land such as council car park or high street. In addition to parking offences, a PCN can also be charged for breaking traffic rules, failing to follow road signs, and not paying the charges for the London congestion zone or low emission zone.

Depending on the severity of the action, PCN charges can range between £50 to £130 and must be paid within due time.

How Many Days Do I Have To Pay For A PCN?

Once a penalty charge notice is issued by council authorities, you will have 28 days to make the payment and in case the amount is paid within 14 days, you may even get a 50 per cent discount on the fine.

However, whether or not you will be able to make a PCN payment online depends on the following factors:

  • The date when the PCN was issued 
  • The due date for the PCN payment
  • The authority who issued the charge
  • The amount of charge in GBP

If your PCN is more than 60 days old, you have been issued an  ‘Order for Recovery of Unpaid Penalty Charge Notice’ more than 21 days ago or you’ve been issued a bailiff’s letter, you will not be able to make an online payment to clear your PCN charges. In this case, you may have to pay through cheque, postal order or in person at the council post office.

If you do not pay your PCN within 28 days, you will be issued a charge certificate after which you will have 14 days to clear your dues. If you fail to do so, an additional amount of 50 per cent will be added to your PCN charges.

Can I Appeal Against A PCN?

Yes, if you believe that you have been incorrectly charged with Penalty Charge Notice, you can appeal to your local council office with your Vehicle Registration Number and Penalty Charge Notice number. However, you must make the appeal before paying for the PCN charges; unless your vehicle has been removed due to a violation of parking restrictions.

If a vehicle owner does not respond to notices left on their car, they will be sent a formal notice termed as a Notice To Owner. They can make a formal appeal to the council in response to this if they have evidence to prove their claim.

If your appeal is found to be valid, you will receive a Notice of Acceptance and the charges will be removed. However, if your appeal is rejected, you will receive a Notice of Rejection. You may still contend this through the London Tribunals, however, if you do not pay the charge even after their response, the council can send a debt collection agency to recover the amount. 

How Do I Appeal Against PCN?

In the case of a notice left on your vehicle by a traffic warden, you must make your appeal before the date mentioned on the notice for payment of your fine. In case of car park charges, you will need to following documents to file an appeal:

  • A copy of your season ticket if it allows you to park in the car park.
  • A copy of your pay and display ticket if it was claimed not to be shown properly. 
  • Your booking reference number and mobile phone if you paid through your mobile.
  • An explanation of not parking within the lines if that was the issue.

Meanwhile, in the case of on-street parking charges, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • A copy of your pay and display ticket if it was claimed to be not shown properly. 
  • A copy of your parking permit if it was claimed not to be shown properly.
  • A copy of your Blue Badge if it was claimed not to be shown properly. 
  • Proof of purchase from a garage in case your vehicle broke down in the street.
  • A letter of confirmation from a medical professional if you had to park on the street due to a medical emergency.
  • A copy of the delivery note if you had parked temporarily to make a delivery.
  • A copy of the hiring agreement of you had hired your car to someone else.
  • Proof of purchase or sale of you did not own the vehicle at the time of incident/notice.
  • The police crime reference number and the phone number of the police station in case your vehicle was stolen when the PCN was issued.
  • Photographs of the area if the parking space did not have any clear marking or mention of parking restrictions.

Who Is A Blue Badge Holder?

Blue Badge concessions are given to drivers with certain medical conditions in the UK, enabling them to park closer to their destinations. As a Blue Badge holder, you can ask your local council to allocate you a parking space that is close to home.

If you qualify for a Blue Badge, you may be able to park for free in the following locations:

  • Unlimited parking on streets with parking meters or pay-and-display machines 
  • Unlimited parking (unless a time limit is displayed on a sign) in disabled parking bays on streets
  • Parking for up to three hours on single or double yellow lines (unless there’s a ‘no loading’ sign)

However, you must keep in mind that having a Blue Badge does not allow claimants to park their car anywhere; they just qualify for certain concessions in specific areas. They will still need to follow parking regulations and can get fined for breaking parking rules. 

What Are The Legal Obligations Of Drivers In The UK?

Legal obligations of drivers in the UK include the following:

  • the vehicle should be registered with DVLA
  • the vehicle must be roadworthy
  • the owner must have paid their current vehicle tax 
  • the owner must have a current mot certificate 
  • the owner must have a minimum of third party insurance 

Car owners are also required to inform the DVLA in case of the following:

  • a change in the owner’s name or gender
  • new contact details including address
  • in case of a medical condition of the driver
  • major alterations to the vehicle
  • sale of the vehicle

Conclusion:

One may pay their PCN either through the post, online transfer, cheque or by using a debit or credit card. While there are many options available to pay your PCN in the Oldham Council area, one must keep in view that once a notice is received by them it must be paid in the next 28 days. If you believe that you have been fined in error, you can appeal in favour of your claim by providing the necessary evidence. However, if your appeal is rejected, you will be bound to pay the amount stated in the PCN.

FAQs: How Do I Pay PCN In Oldham? 

Can you pay PCN  at the post office?

You can take the PCN with you to the post office; however, payments, in this case, will only be made using a debit or credit card.

How do I contact Oldham council?

You can contact Oldham council through their website Contact | Oldham Council. You will find here different sections of varied areas of interest. You can click on the section of your interest and share your feedback or query.

How do I pay for a lost parking ticket in the UK?

If you have lost a parking ticket in the UK, you can contact the local council office for your PCN. It carries your vehicle registration number and the amount due for payment.

How do you pay for parking online?

To pay for parking online, you must start with registering your vehicle plate number, then select desired location and duration of stay and end with clicking on the ‘Park Now’ button to complete your payment transaction.

How much is the PCN for congestion charge?

The daily charge is £15 if you choose to pay the same day or in advance. This amount will increase to £17.50 by midnight on the third day of your travel. If you fail to pay the amount by then, a PCN will be issued to you.

References:

Parking tickets and fines | Oldham Council

Oldham PCN Payments

Oldham-metropolitan-borough-council

Oldham_parking_policy

Motability, Blue Badge Scheme and discounted travel | MoneyHelper

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John has 22 years of experience in financial services. This spans across financial research, financial services (As a qualified mortgage broker and underwriter), financial trading and sales at global investment banks. While working as a publishing research analyst, he covered European bank credit and advised institutional clients on investment strategies at both JP Morgan and Societe Generale. John has passed all three levels of the CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) programme.

John has 22 years of experience in financial services. This spans across financial research, financial services (As a qualified mortgage broker and underwriter), financial trading and sales at global investment banks. While working as a publishing research analyst, he covered European bank credit and advised institutional clients on investment strategies at both JP Morgan and Societe Generale. John has passed all three levels of the CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) programme.